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Use of Historical Documents in the Classroom

 

The Causes of the Great Depression

 


Sharon Rounds         

Crestwood High School

 

Summer 2008

 


“The Hoover Panic Cure,” The Literary Digest, Vol. CIII, No. 9,

November 20, 1929, pp. 7-9.

Hoover Presidential Library Reprints

1929 November to 1929 December 5, Box 55, Hoover Library

 

 

Students often feel that the only reason for the depression was that the Stock Market crashed on October 29, 1929.  This lesson is to give them some insight into the real causes of the Depression and help them compare what is happening today to that time period.

 

Overview/ Materials/LOC Resources/Standards/ Procedures/Evaluation/Rubric/Handouts/Extension

 

Overview                                                        Back to Navigation Bar

Objectives

Students will:

·        be able to explain the global context of the Great Depression and the reasons for the worldwide economic collapse.

·        evaluate the causes of the Great Depression.

·        analyze the causes and consequences of the stock market crash of 1929.

·        compare and contrast the Great Depression to the recent economic happenings.

Recommended time frame

1 week with research in the library

Grade level

9th grade 20th Century American History

Curriculum fit

History, English

Materials

  • PowerPoint entitled “The Real Causes of the Depression” by Mrs. Rounds
  • Computer Lab
  • Cartoon Analysis Worksheet
  • Photo Analysis Worksheet

National Learning Standards                      Back to Navigation Bar

 

U.S. History

Standard 1A: The student understands the causes of the crash of 1929 and the Great Depression.

  • Analyze multiple causation.
  • Compare competing historical narratives.

Language Arts:

GOAL 3: Write to communicate for a variety of purposes.

·        3.B. The learner will compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.

 

Procedures                                                     Back to Navigation Bar

 

Students will view the PowerPoint presentation on the Great Depression and its causes and be able to explain a political cartoon’s significance between the Great Depression and the stock market of today.

Day One: View the PowerPoint Presentation.  Explain assignment regarding the political cartoon.

Days Two through Four:  Research in library using the Library of Congress website as one of their resources (www.loc.gov).  They will be allowed to work in pairs.

Day Five:  In class, answer any final questions and prepare for individual presentations.

 

Evaluation                                                      Back to Navigation Bar

 

Students will be graded on their written text as well as their presentation in class.  The grade will depend on how well they can explain the connections between the two time periods and their examples given.

 

Extension                                                      Back to Navigation Bar

 

·        Students will analyze a political cartoon from the era using the cartoon analysis page from the Library of Congress.

·        Students will analyze a photo from the era and write a newspaper article about it based on their knowledge of the Depression and what is happening in the photo.

 

 


Primary Resources from the Library of Congress

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Resource Table for the Great Depression

Sharon Rounds, creator

IMAGE

DESCRIPTION

CITATION

URL

This speech by Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover outlines strategies for eliminating waste to increase efficiency in the distribution process.  The methods he suggests include the use of statistics, standardization, and simplification of business practices.

Hoover, Herbert Clark, President, U.S., 1874 – 1964, National distribution conference speech, January 14-15, 1925

http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gdc/amrlg.lg64

An excerpt from Recent Social Trends in the United States, a two-volume examination of the social state of the United States at the end of the1920s undertaken at the direction of President Herbert Hoover. The study covers topics ranging from population growth to crime and punishment and from leisure-time activities to changes in employment and family life brought about by advancing technology. Reproduced here from volume 2 is chapter 16, "Labor Groups in the Social Structure," by Leo Wolman and Gustav Peck. It examines recent developments in American industry as they affect labor.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESSCALL NUMBER
HN57 .P7 1933a,

http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gdc/amrlg.lg42

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cartoon depicting a “bull” market being attacked by a “bear” market; many forgot that the law of gravity had not been repealed for stock purchases.

Published in the Washington Post (126) LC-YSZ62-126928

http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/
herblock/sand.html

“The Hoover Panic Cure” - article

The Literary Digest, New York: vol.103,no.9, Nov. 30, 1929

http://www.presidential
timeline.org/html/
educators/HCH/
stockmarket_kac/assets.php

Shoemaker cartoon originally printed in the Chicago Daily News

The Literary Digest, New York: vol.103,no.9, Nov. 30, 1929

“The Hoover Panic Cure,” The Literary Digest, Vol. CIII, No. 9, November 20, 1929, pp. 7-9. Hoover Presidential Library Reprints 1929 November to 1929 December 5, Box 55, Hoover Library

 

Ding Darling cartoon

Allan Hoover papers

Topical File: Campaign of 1932, “Ding Darling Cartoons,” Allan Hoover Papers, Topical File, Hoover, Herbert, Allied Expeditionary Force (AEF) pass, 1919 TO Topical File, Hoover, Herbert, Campaign of 1952, MacArthur, Douglas, 1952, Box 10, Hoover Library.

 

Book: The Memoirs of Herbert Hoover Volume: Vol. Three: The Great Depression 1929 - 1941

 

Chapter 1. The Origins of the Great Depression: The Depression was not started in the United States

 

The MacMillan Company: New York, 1952

 

http://www.ecommcode.com/hoover/
ebooks/pdf/FULL/B1V3_Full.pdf

Cartoon "Going Into A Huddle" by Ding Darling

 

Published in the Des Moines Register, November 21, 1929

 

http://www.presidential
timeline.org/html/educators
/HCH/stockmarket_kac/assets.php

Wall Street near the time of the Stock Market Crash

Presidential Time Line – Herbert Hoover  -photographs

http://presidentialtimeline.org/html/
recordImage.php?iid=0066&ptit

Waiting for relief checks. Calipatria, California.

Lange, Dorothea, photographer.

http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8b31768

Abandoned farm of the western Panhandle, Cimmaron [i.e. Cimarron] County, Oklahoma.

Lange, Dorothea, photographer.

http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8b38703

Stock Market Table showing Depression

On site given

http://mutualfunds.about.com/cs/
history/l/bl1929graph.htm

 

Wall Street’s “Prosperity Panic”

The Literary Digest, New York: vol. 103, no. 6, Nov. 9, 1929

http://www.presidential
timeline.org/html/
educators/HCH/
stockmarket_kac/assets.php

Ding Darling Cartoon

Ding Darling Cartoon, Hoover Presidential Library

http://hoover.archives.gov/
education/cartoons.html

 

http://hoover.archives.gov/
education/cartoons.html

 

Editorial comment on the Wall Street situation as assembled by the Associated Press

October 1929 to November 1929

http://www.presidentialtimeline.org
/html/educators/HCH/stockmarket
_kac/assets.php

Ding Darling Cartoon on equalization fees

Des Moines Register

Hoover Presidential Library, Ding Darling Cartoons 1918 – 1930, Box 1, Hoover Library

 

Shoemaker, originally in the Chicago Daily News

“A Tariff Fight on that may Wreck Parties,” The Literary Digest, Vol. CIII, No. 5, November 2, 1929, pp. 7-12

Hoover Presidential Library Reprints, 1929 November to 1929 December 5, box 55, Hoover Library

 

 

 

 Rubric

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Research Report: Comparing the Depression to Today


Teacher Name: Mrs. Rounds


Student Name:     ________________________________________

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Organization

Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs and subheadings.

Information is organized with well-constructed paragraphs.

Information is organized, but paragraphs are not well-constructed.

The information appears to be disorganized.

Sources

All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented in the desired format.

All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented, but a few are not in the desired format.

All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented, but many are not in the desired format.

Some sources are not accurately documented.

Amount of Information

All topics are addressed and all questions answered with at least 2 sentences about each.

All topics are addressed and most questions answered with at least 2 sentences about each.

All topics are addressed, and most questions answered with 1 sentence about each.

One or more topics were not addressed.

Mechanics

No grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors.

Almost no grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors

A few grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors.

Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors.

Quality of Information

Information clearly relates to the main topic. It includes several supporting details and/or examples.

Information clearly relates to the main topic. It provides 1-2 supporting details and/or examples.

Information clearly relates to the main topic. No details and/or examples are given.

Information has little or nothing to do with the main topic.

Diagrams & Illustrations

Diagrams and illustrations are neat, accurate and add to the reader's understanding of the topic.

Diagrams and illustrations are accurate and add to the reader's understanding of the topic.

Diagrams and illustrations are neat and accurate and sometimes add to the reader's understanding of the topic.

Diagrams and illustrations are not accurate OR do not add to the reader's understanding of the topic.

 

Date Created: Aug 12, 2008 11:07 am (CDT)

 


Handouts

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PowerPoint Presentation

Click on the picture below to view the PowerPoint presentation. If that does not work, right-click on the picture and select Save Target As.

 


 

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